Broken Glass

by Alain Mabanckou

KSh 1,290

The history of Credit Gone West, a squalid Congolese bar, is related by one of its most loyal customers, Broken Glass, who has been commissioned by its owner to set down an account of the characters who frequent it. Broken Glass himself is a disgraced alcoholic school teacher with a love of French language and literature which he has largely failed to communicate to his pupils but which he displays in the pages of his notebook. The notebook is also a farewell to the bar and to his fellow drinkers. After writing the final words, Broken Glass will go down to the River Tchinouka and throw himself into its murky waters, where his lamented mother also drowned. Broken Glass is a Congolese riff on European classics from the most notable Francophone African writer of his generation.

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Description

Author: Alain Mabanckou
ISBN: 9781846685842
Country: Republic of Congo
Publisher: Serpent’s Tail
Size (mm): 128 x 198 x 16
Pages: 176
Format: Paperback
Colour: Black & White
Weight 158.76 grams
Language: English
Publication Date: 13 Apr 2015

 

Alain Mabanckou (born 24 February 1966) is a novelist, journalist, poet, and academic, a French citizen born in the Republic of the Congo, he is currently a Professor of Literature in the United States. He is best known for his novels and non-fiction writing depicting the experience of contemporary Africa and the African diaspora in France. He is among the best known and most successful writers in the French language and one of the best known African writers in France. He is also controversial, and criticized by some African and diaspora writers for stating Africans bear responsibility for their own misfortune.

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Alain Mabanckou

Alain Mabanckou (born 24 February 1966) is a novelist, journalist, poet, and academic, a French citizen born in the Republic of the Congo, he is currently a Professor of Literature in the United States. He is best known for his novels and non-fiction writing depicting the experience of contemporary Africa and the African diaspora in France. He is among the best known and most successful writers in the French language and one of the best known African writers in France. He is also controversial, and criticized by some African and diaspora writers for stating Africans bear responsibility for their own misfortune.