Black Moses

by Alain Mabanckou

KSh 1,790

LONGLISTED FOR THE MAN BOOKER INTERNATIONAL PRIZE 2017.

It’s 1970, and in the People’s Republic of Congo a Marxist-Leninist revolution is ushering in a new age. But over at the orphanage on the outskirts of Pointe-Noire where young Moses has grown up, the revolution has only strengthened the reign of terror of Dieudonne Ngoulmoumako, the institution’s corrupt director. So Moses escapes to Pointe-Noire, where he finds a home with a larcenous band of Congolese Merry Men and among the Zairian prostitutes of the Trois-Cents quarter. But the authorities won’t leave Moses in peace, and intervene to chase both the Merry Men and the Trois-Cents girls out of town. All this injustice pushes poor Moses over the edge. Could he really be the Robin Hood of the Congo? Or is he just losing his marbles?

Black Moses is a larger-than-life comic tale of a young man obsessed with helping the helpless in an unjust world. It is also a vital new extension of Mabanckou’s extraordinary, interlinked body of work dedicated to his native Congo, and confirms his status as one of our great storytellers.

Quantity:

Description

Sub-title:
Author: Alain Mabanckou
ISBN: 9781781256732
Country: Nigeria
Publisher: Profile Books Ltd [Serpent’s Tail]
Size (mm): 144 x 222 x 25
Pages: 304
Format: Hardback
Colour: Black and White
Weight 376g
Language: English
Publication Date: 20 Apr 2017

There are no reviews yet.

Add your review

Alain Mabanckou

Alain Mabanckou (born 24 February 1966) is a novelist, journalist, poet, and academic, a French citizen born in the Republic of the Congo, he is currently a Professor of Literature in the United States. He is best known for his novels and non-fiction writing depicting the experience of contemporary Africa and the African diaspora in France. He is among the best known and most successful writers in the French language and one of the best known African writers in France. He is also controversial, and criticized by some African and diaspora writers for stating Africans bear responsibility for their own misfortune.